Our Historic Antebellum Home

The tranquility of the seven-acre park-like setting at Linden Antebellum Bed & Breakfast, located near the Natchez Trace, is captivating. An immediate sense of homecoming is the description most often used by visitors in their comments about their stay. Soon our guests find themselves enjoying the leisurely pace of this gracious B&B, where the simplest things feel like adventures to the heart and soul.

Some of the most joyous and memorable moments in life are made while spending time visiting with family and friends on galleries. Our galleries are great places to meet fellow travelers, make new friends and become part of our family. Gather to play cards or board games at the tables…rock the day away if you want. Our galleries are spacious, welcoming and yours to enjoy.

Each morning you’ll have the opportunity to sip your first cup of coffee on our back gallery. A full Southern Breakfast is served in the formal dining room where you may have the pleasure of meeting and conversing with our other guests.

History at Linden Antebellum Bed & Breakfast

Originally owned by Alexander Moore and passed down to his son, James Moore, the central two-story, 4-room section of the mansion was constructed in 1785, and known as “Oaklands”. In 1818, the United States Senator and former Attorney General of Mississippi, Thomas Buck Reed, purchased the property from Moore and renamed it “Reedland”. Senator Reed made his mark on the house by adding the stunning frontispiece to the doorway (that is said to be the inspiration for the front door of Tara in Gone With the Wind) as well as the existing East wing. Shortly before his death, which occurred while en route to take his seat in Washington D.C, Senator Reed sold the residence to Dr. John Ker in 1829. Having moved to Natchez after President Thomas Jefferson appointed Ker’s father to the Supreme Court of Mississippi, Dr. John Ker became a prominent physician and planter in the area. Once Ker attained ownership, he changed the name to “Linden”. Ker also left his mark on the mansion by adding the living room and the front gallery. With these additions, Linden reached its present form. In 1849, Jane E. Conner purchased Linden after her husband died, for herself and her 9 children. She planted 7 Cedars of Lebanon in front of Linden, which still stand today. The current owner is the 6th generation of the Conner family.